Watch out for dog food nonsense

By on July 2, 2019

I try to feed my four dogs carefully and well. Mainly I cook for them every day. I just throw into the crockpot chicken, rice, carrot, pinch of salt and water to cover. They love it and seem to thrive.

However, I see all over the web ads for “new and improved” dog food that mostly seems to toot their horn because they have no grains in their formulae.

What a bunch of nonsense. dogs and wolves in the wild eat small animals who have lived on grains. Its the circle of life.

Here are a list of dog foods that claim to be healthy but aren’t. avoid them.

F.D.A. Names 16 Brands of Dog Food That May Be Linked to Canine Heart Disease

Several brands of “grain-free” dog food have been linked to canine heart disease, the F.D.A. found after a monthslong investigation.

The Food and Drug Administration identified 16 brands of dog food that had been linked to heart disease in dogs, according to a report the agency published on Thursday.

In the report, the F.D.A. named for the first time the pet food brands most frequently associated with adverse events. In descending order of most incidents of heart disease, the brands are Acana, Zignature, Taste of the Wild, 4Health, Earthborn Holistic, Blue Buffalo, Nature’s Domain, Fromm, Merrick, California Natural, Natural Balance, Orijen, Nature’s Variety, NutriSource, Nutro and Rachael Ray Nutrish.

The heart condition examined in the report, canine dilated cardiomyopathy, often results in heart failure and is believed to have a genetic component, according to the report. The disease usually affects large breeds, but the F.D.A. said it knew of smaller dogs that had also been afflicted.

The disease was most frequently reported to the F.D.A. in golden retrievers, but the report noted that breed-specific social media groups and activities raised awareness of the issue in these communities of golden retriever owners, who perhaps disproportionately notified the F.D.A. of their dogs’ diagnoses.

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Most of the dog foods listed are usually labeled “grain-free” and contain a large proportion of peas, lentils, legume seeds or potatoes, according to the report. Many of the dogs researched in the investigation did not have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the F.D.A. said.

The Pet Food Institute said in a statement that it was “committed to the health of pets and take seriously the responsibility to make safe, complete and balanced food for our dogs and cats.”

“This is a complex issue with many factors requiring scientific evaluation,” the statement said.

Midwestern Pet Foods, which owns the Earthborn Holistic brand, said in a statement that the F.D.A. had not yet provided scientific findings connecting nutrition and canine dilated cardiomyopathy. With the report, the company said, the “F.D.A. is simply attempting to gain more information as part of its evaluation process.”

“The report only touches upon the genetic or congenital prevalence of the disease,” the company said on Sunday, “hinting that the disease may have a nutritional component without suggesting a nutritional solution.”

Using an abbreviation for the disease, the F.D.A. said in its report that it was “using a range of science-based investigative tools as it strives to learn more about this emergence of D.C.M. and its potential link to certain diets or ingredients.” The agency added, “We understand the concern that pet owners have about these reports: The illnesses can be severe, even fatal, and many cases report eating ‘grain-free’ labeled pet food.”

About Linda Eckhardt

Linda West Eckhardt, is an award winning journalist, food writer, and nutritionist. Her more than 20 cookbooks have garnered prizes including the James Beard prize for the best cookbook for a text she wrote with her daughter, Katherine West DeFoyd, entitled Entertaining 101, Doubleday. Their follow-up book, Stylish One Dish Dinners, Doubleday, was also nominated for a James Beard prize. Their next book, The High Protein Cookbook, Clarkson Potter, remains a best seller after 12 years. That book was designed to accompany low carb diet plans. Her ground-breaking book, Bread in Half The Time, Broadway Books, was named the Best Cookbook in America by the prestigious IACP, The Julia Child award. Her award winning radio work with Jennifer English, for a national show on the Food and Wine radio network, was nominated for a James Beard Prize for a show called, “I Know What You Ate Last Summer.”

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